Ghostpoet – In store signing session at Pie&Vinyl

Where?  – In store, at Pie&Vinyl…sure.

When – Come and meet Obaro at 5:30pm on Monday 13th November DINNERTIME, HOW HANDY!

How much? – Free of course! But order the NEW album ‘Dark Days + Canapes’ to be signed HERE and get priority entry (Skip the queue and go first, no waiting around!)

Come and say ‘Pie’ to GHOSTPOET, and ask him how it was making one of the records of this year (ignore the inevitable pastry around his mouth) and pick up a personalised signed record.

Ghostpoet will then scamper off and play The Wedgewood Rooms that same evening. Tickets are available HERE

Whilst you’re in the shop, get your hearty soul dinner as we’ll be selling a special Ghostpoet edition pie, chosen by Obaro himself!

Join our Facialbook event HERE

More details on new record below:

Ghostpoet0417_Gullick_Q8A0316 lower-res (002)

Dark Days + Canapés’ is Ghostpoet’s most defining album to date. A stunning and stimulating return, ‘Dark Days + Canapés’ is a record that captures the sense of unease felt by so many in recent times.

After receiving recognition for the beat-driven arrangements of his first two albums, third album ‘Shedding Skin’ initiated a more alt-rock sound that saw Ghostpoet Mercury nominated for a second time. New album ‘Dark Days + Canapés’, produced by Leo Abrahams, best known for his work with Brian Eno and Jon Hopkins, delves even further into a fuller, guitar driven sound.

When commenting on the first track from the album, ‘Immigrant Boogie’, Ghostpoet aka Obaro Ejimiwe explains; I’m usually more comfortable writing in ambiguous terms, but this time around I felt there were specific stories that needed telling.”

Serendipity and experimentalism were embraced in the studio and several original ideas evolved or were supplanted by something unexpected. On ‘Freakshow’ the addition of manic laughter from a gospel choir, who had turned up to sing on a different track, compounds the crazed nature of the song, whilst ‘Blind As A Bat…’, influenced by Talk Talk’s ‘Laughing Stock’, saw string players invited to improvise with fragments of their performance sampled and overlaid to build something less structured, more wayward and reflective of the state of mind of the protagonist.

Typically self-effacing, Obaro says; “there’s a sort of life-force that Leo and the other musicians brought to this record, and that was crucial. I want people to listen to the songs and be able to say, ‘So Isn’t just me then? Phew.”

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave your comment

Please be polite. You can use these HTML tags: STRONG, A, BLOCKQUOTE, CODE

Required. Won't be published.